The Moor

There are few places as romanticised yet feared as the moors: think Wuthering Heights and The Hound of the Baskervilles. They are vast expanses of land which lend themselves to loneliness, yet they are brought brilliantly to life by William Atkins.

His account of moorlands from the south to the north of the country is peppered with lively personal accounts (his description of his GCSE paper made me laugh out loud), fascinating historical tales of yesteryear (which include murderers and monks, smugglers and priests, gamekeepers and ramblers, miners and poets) and astonishing wildlife observations of the past, present, and possible future. Reading The Moors is like taking a walk across the blasted landscape without having to leave your armchair – and with the most fascinating guide you could ever wish for, leading you every step of the way. Best of all, by the end of it, you will be desperate to see it for real.

WIN! WIN! WIN!

Love the sound of this book? You could win it and others in a giveaway running on www.gobewild.co.uk

The books  were all shortlisted for the Thwaites Wainwright Prize 2015, an annual award that showcases the best books in UK nature and travel writing. Celebrating the legacy of renowned British nature writer Alfred Wainwright, the prize reflects his core values of inspiring people to explore the outdoors, whilst engendering a love of landscape and respect for nature.

TO ENTER THE PRIZE DRAW VISIT WWW.GOBEWILD.CO.UK FOR DETAILS

Advertisements